About us

Our Mission

The New York State Middle School Association (NYSMSA) represents those who serve the educational needs of all young adolescents in New York State. We are committed to creating, promoting, and supporting effective middle-level programs that are academically rigorous and developmentally responsive.

Our Vision

NYSMSA acts on our belief that all young adolescents are entitled to academically-rich and developmentally-appropriate programs. Toward this end, we work collaboratively within the educational community and beyond to make high-performing middle-level programs the norm in New York State through full implementation of the Regents Policy Statement on Middle Education, the Education Department’s Essential Elements of Standards-Focused Middle-Level Schools and Programs, and research-based best practice.

Our Goals: Advocacy, Service & Collaboration

NYSMSA’s beliefs are listed below. Taking into consideration current research and available resources, these beliefs are viewed through the lens of the NYS Essential Elements of Standards-Focused Middle-Level Schools and Programs, and the Regents Policy Statement on Middle Level Education and will assist the Association in supporting the improvement of instruction for middle-level students in New York State.

Advocacy

NYSMSA believes that we must provide leadership and coordination in advocating for the following in all schools that serve middle-level students:

  • a philosophy and mission that reflect the intellectual and developmental needs and characteristics of young adolescents (youth 10-14 years of age);
  • an educational program that is comprehensive, challenging, purposeful, integrated, relevant, and standards-based;
  • an organization and structure that support both academic excellence and personal development.
  • classroom instruction appropriate to the needs and characteristics of young adolescents provided by skilled and knowledgeable teachers;
  • strong educational leadership and a building administration that encourage, facilitate, and sustain involvement, participation, and partnerships;
  • a network of academic and personal support available for all students; and
  • professional learning and staff development for all staff that are ongoing, planned, purposeful, and collaboratively developed.

Service

NYSMSA believes that we must provide leadership and coordination to:

  • be the primary source of information and resources on young adolescents and their schooling in New York State;
  • provide a variety of resources (publications, models of best practices, professional development,, etc.) in support of appropriate programs for young adolescents;
  • offer support to schools, at all levels of performance, in refining and strengthening their middle-level programs;
  • provide member services to public and non-public urban, suburban, and rural schools;
  • engage regional directors who provide, assist, and support regional and state activities;
  • support the ongoing importance of office of Middle-Level Education Program in SED;
  • develop and disseminate position papers that provide guidance on appropriate programmatic, curricular, instructional, and assessment issues; and
  • recognize and honor outstanding middle-level schools, programs, individuals, and groups.

Collaboration

NYSMSA believes that we must provide leadership and coordination to:

  • implement a collaborative relationship with the State Education Department and others who impact the lives of young adolescents;
  • work with other associations in sponsoring professional development activities;
  • develop and expand cooperative ventures and relationships with corporations and businesses;
  • create networks of educators, parents, and others involved in the lives of young adolescents;
  • serve on the boards of supportive organizations;
  • engage in continuous planning through participation and shared decision-making;
  • influence the quality and content of pre-service and in-service education for prospective and practicing middle-level educators; and
  • work with constituent groups to identify effective models for programmatic, curricular, instructional, and assessment issues.

 

Revised and adopted, July 15, 2009.